Silver BushPhotograph by Michael Zide

Walking back with my two dog companions, we climbed a path that took us along the overhanging cliff that parallels the beach. In the brooding light, the bleached wood of the worn scrubby brush caught my eye. Whether writhing in pain, or dancing in ecstasy, its twisted branches seemed to continue animating its dead form, resembling an undersea creature caught in the moving currents, denying it the chance to find a peaceful resting place.

Landscape photography is mostly recognizing opportunity. It’s about taking the world in visually and emotionally in an instant, when the weather, the light and the landscape act as allies and collaborators towards a creative end. The more the subject creates a tension between what it is and what it alludes to or suggests in my mind, the higher the pitch of excitement and anticipation, and of course, the more magnified the fear of potential failure in letting the opportunity escape.

Like most days on the Vineyard, my dogs were walking with me. This particular day , we were heading up Island along the beach at Windy Gates. A late afternoon fog came on shore. The light that had been casting strong shadows onto the clay and rocks had quickly become soft and directionless. Whatever preconceived notions I had carried in my head about what I might find to photograph, evaporated. Walking back with my two dog companions, we climbed a path that took us along the overhanging cliff that parallels the beach. In the brooding light, the bleached wood of the worn scrubby brush caught my eye. Whether writhing in pain, or dancing in ecstasy, its twisted branches seemed to continue animating its dead form, resembling an undersea creature caught in the moving currents, denying it the chance to find a peaceful resting place.

The gesture, the soft silver light reflecting from the dried branches, and the surrounding grey fog brought clarity to the moment. All the layers of interest had come together. All that was left was the gentle release of the shutter.

Artist
Michael Zide It was sunrise in Southern California, January 11, 1949. Something drew me to the bedroom window. I looked out to the front yard and for miles beyond. The familiar scene of my childhood was gone. Our front lawn with its towering evergreen tree, the vacant lot down the hill and the boulevard leading to Griffith Part were luminous. My world, where the landscape had been a constant was trasformed -covered now in a pure white blanket of what appeared to my five year old eyes to be diamond dust. It was a scene beyond my comprehension and my response was visceral. That moment is as immediate to me now as it was decades ago. My wife summed up the journey that followed perfectly. “That first snowfall set in motion both the search for a view of equal enchantment, as well as a visual memory in search of meaning.” Establishing a point of view or personal vision is at the core of my work n landscape photography. Oscar Wilde said of another medium, “Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter.” Each walk on the beach or into the forest is an opportunity to get in touch with the landscape in front of the lens and the landscape within. For an image to speak clearly, the photographer must have something to say. Beyond that, there is always an element of change, being present at the right moment as the light reveals form that strokes a chord of recognition. From that point on, intuition and experience take over. Why black and white? Black and white photography lays open the bones of the image. It’s direct and to the point. Time and place are always present in the image. I photograph where I live because it’s what I know and it’s accessible. Everything changes with time, including the way I see. I revisit many locations over the seasons and over the years, hopeful that I can get out of my own way, and truly “listen with my eyes.”
Location
Menemsha Hills Trail9783+HF Chilmark, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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PuckerbrushSong by Carly Simon

The first emotion that arrived in me through this photo was anger and fear which emanated from the wiry hair like puckerbrush. But then there was that subtle fog and clouds in the background which gave me a feeling of faith. I felt like God might somehow suddenly appear on the scene and seemed to save me. I felt as though the image was captured beside a railroad track where nothing could grow. It reminded me of a time as a teenager when I accidentally took an express train out to the Bronx and it brought me all the way out to 125th street in New York City. I had to walk under a railway bridge to get to the other side of the track where I could head back. I was so scared. It was winter and so dark and I was afraid I was going to step on “the third rail” or that something terrifying would jump out at me on the other side of the overpass.

Artist
Carly Simon Born in New York City, Carly Simon won her first of three Grammy for Best New Artist in 1971. Carly’s first hit single, “You’re So Vain,” was released in 1973. Years later, “Let the River Run” (1988) won Carly her third Grammy and first Oscar. She was later inspired by her experiences as a mother to record a Grammy winning children’s album and, in 1989 with the publication of Amy the Dancing Bear, to become a children’s author. Since then, she’s published several more titles, and released several albums, including 2008’s This Kind of Love.
Location
Menemsha Hills Trail9792+VF Chilmark, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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UntitledPainting by Doug Kent

The song sounded like an English Celtic tune at first. I liked it. It would have been hard for me to create at all if I didn’t like it. I wanted to hear more of it. It’s very short. If I had to sum it up I’d say the song was haunted and was full of mysterious movement. The word “Puckerbrush” recalled to me my younger days in the 1960s when we: James Taylor, Kingman Brewster, Jim Hull and a bunch of us back then, were all connected through these back unpaved, puckerbrush lined roads. We’d all ride our motorcycles or horses up to each other’s houses to hang. I haven’t heard the word Puckerbrush since then. I was living in a place off Lambert’s Cove Road at the time and raising goats in my basement. When I made this drawing I left the song on repeat and the music fed me. This drawing is what came out. When I’m drawing as opposed to painting, I just let the work come directly through me onto the page with out a plan. In this case, the song spoke through me to the page. I was just the filter.

Artist
Doug Kent Doug Kent has been living and working on the island of Martha’s Vineyard for over thirty years. Originally informed by Surrealists, the German Expressionists and American Painters of the early 20th century. Doug found inspiration for his continually evolving and evocative art from the intensely beautiful landscapes surrounding him.
In recent years, Doug developed an innovative technique that combines water color and acrylics on unique surfaces like wood and iron. Doug has exhibited in galleries in Massachusetts, New York, San Francisco and Tokyo. His work resides in collections as far afield as Singapore, Australia, Japan, Europe, and Latin America.
Location
Menemsha Hills, Brick Yard97G4+J9 Chilmark, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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With Eyes OpenedTea by Stacy Lim

I meditated after seeing this painting and what came to me was a story about these characters I named “Tiger God” and “The Fish Woman.” The Fish Woman is looking forward into the future where there are no boundaries, the sky’s the limit and she’s literally coming out of her shell to signify she is no longer stuck in the past. The Tiger God faces backward into the past and looks over his shoulder at her in judgment and condemnation. He is literally cloaked in tradition, secretive and stuck in the past and in fear. To tell this story through my tea I chose a strawberry ginger toffee blend with a dragonwell base. Dragonwell represents the Tiger God. It is one of the oldest most traditional teas. It’s got a crisp sea like taste to it and it’s light enough not to drag down the hope of the Fish woman which I represented with strawberry, and wanted to be the overriding flavor. The toffee represents new directions and is the last flavor you taste.

Description Of Olfactory: I thought “How am I going to turn this painting into a tea?” I settled on a strawberry ginger toffee blend with a dragonwell base. I chose dragonwell it cause it’s one of the oldest teas and therefore, traditional. It’s got a crisp sea like taste to it. It is lighter in flavor so that the hope (represented by the strawberry) can ride the flavor and not be dragged down by the traditional heavy past. I used ginger cause it’s old and global. The strawberry provides hope and knowledge that there is a good future ahead so I wanted that to be the most dominant flavor. The toffee represents new directions and is the last flavor you can taste.

Artist
Stacy Lim Stacy Lim earned her Masters of Business Administration with a specialization in finance from Rider University, which helped her turn her love of tea into a career. She founded, owns, and operates Butiki Teas, a successful luxury tea company that focuses on high quality, unique, and rare teas. Tea blends are created with a focus on marrying the natural flavors of the tea with interesting and fun flavors. Some of the creative teas include Potato Pancakes & Applesauce, Pistachio Ice Cream, Champagne & Rose Cream, and Rhubarb Vanilla Ale. For Consenses, Stacy created ‘With Open Eyes’. With Open Eyes pairs a premium Hangzhou Dragon Well with the flavor of fresh picked strawberries, soothing ginger, and subtle buttery toffee. The chestnut, damp moss, and marine notes of the Hangzhou Dragon Well mingle with and compliment the strawberry, ginger, and toffee notes.
Location
Menemsha Hills96CW+WQ Chilmark, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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The Man Who VanishedCharacter and Plot by Wes Craven
Artist
Wes Craven Born on August 2, 1939, in Cleveland, Ohio, Wes Craven went on to direct horror films like Last House on the Left, The Hills Have Eyes and Swamp Thing before helming the infamous Nightmare on Elm Street. He scored another major hit with SCREAM, which sparked the phenomenal trilogy and was the winner of MTV’s 1996 Best Movie Award and grossed more than $100 million domestically, as did SCREAM 2 (1997). Craven has also directed the school drama Music of the Heart and thriller Red Eye, and done TV work.
Location
Menemsha Hills969W+C3 Chilmark, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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What do you see? Stop 4

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