MigrationPhotograph by Elizabeth Cecil

This series of images taken on the Island were mostly about seeking space. I have always been drawn to birds who have the freedom and the expansiveness of the sky. Seeing these birds in flight I felt my own longing for that kind of flight and freedom.

Artist
Elizabeth Cecil Elizabeth Cecil is a fine art and editorial photographer based on Martha’s Vineyard. Elizabeth specializes in food, travel and agricultural photography while always pursuing personal bodies of work. She contributes to multiple publications on the island and is the founding and current Photo Editor for Edible Vineyard (2010-present). Elizabeth fell in love with photography chasing trains with her dad in Milwaukee. She made her first pictures with a blue Fisher Price and a roll of 110 film and the excitement of making images has stayed with her ever since.
Location
State Beach Pedestrian walk way269 Edgartown Oak Bluffs Rd, Edgartown, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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Leaving BirdsSong by Mark Erelli

The photo evoked bleakness, but also a sense of stark beauty. The birds aren’t centered; they look like they’ve been frozen in the middle of an exodus towards the edge of the frame. I’d sum the image up in one word: leaving. I was focused on the birds, so the lines with the avian imagery like “this town would surely be deserted if not for mourning doves and crows,” were birthed from images that came to me of these old-timers perched on their barstool roosts. Humans have always envied birds for their flight, but I think it’s deeper than that. For me, flight represents a freedom from ties, the ability to escape. That’s something I think we’ve all felt the urge to do at one time or another. After I settled on the influence of the birds, I simply fleshed out a back-story populated with characters that are rooted in place which envy one that wants to take flight.

Artist
Mark Erelli Discovered when he was 23, Mark Erelli released his debut album in 1999. For the past 10 years, he’s toured internationally, sharing the stage with Dave Alvin, Gillian Welch, John Hiatt and others, and appearing at many major folk festivals, including Newport, Philadelphia and Shrewsbury (UK). Erelli gained notoriety as a multi-instrumentalist, accompanying artists like Lori McKenna and Josh Ritter everywhere from Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry to London’s Royal Albert Hall. In 2009, he was one of eight artists invited to participate in the Darwin Song Project, a collaborative release featuring songs inspired by the life and work of Charles Darwin.
Location
Jaws BridgeJaws Bridge, Seaview Avenue, Edgartown, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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La fin d’après-midiDance by Bridgman|Packer Dance

The essence of the song for us was a sense of impermanence and nostalgia. We chose to approach our choreography without a literal interpretation of the lyrics, so after listening to the song many times, we put it aside. We performed the dance and edited the video without the music, and then added it back in at the end of the creative process.

We got this idea of a relationship through time and the idea of leaving. We decided to film different passages back and forth through the frame with various meetings and fadings in and out characters representing impermanence. It seemed like there was an autumn feeling to the song, which is why we used sepia tone. We used the appearing and disappearing characters to explore the duality of identity acknowledging that we’re not always just one personality or emotion or entity and that we are complex and can have many feelings at the same time. For example, the sentiment “should I stay or should I go?” Our passage through the frames could be a metaphor for different memories or dreams or projections or thoughts or fantasy. At the end, at the table, there is finally a sense of place and a rustic elegant sensibility to it but then even that is impermanent and disappears around us.

Artist
Bridgman|Packer Dance Art Bridgman and Myrna Packer, Artistic Directors of Bridgman|Packer Dance, are collaborators in performance and choreography and have toured their work throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and Central America. Their innovative work developing “Video Partnering” — the integration of live performance and video technology — has been acclaimed for its highly visual and visceral alchemy of the live and the virtual. The 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship awarded to Bridgman and Packer was the first in the history of the Guggenheim Foundation to be given to two individuals for their collaborative work. Bridgman and Packer are recipients of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts for eight consecutive years from 2007 through 2014 and grants from New England Foundation for the Arts, New York State Council for the Arts, National Dance Project, USArtists International, Performing Americas Project, and La Red. They have received two Choreography Fellowships and a BUILD grant from the New York Foundation for the Arts, four National Performance Network Creation Fund Awards, and choreographic commissions from Dance Theater Workshop (now New York Live Arts), Portland Ovations, Danspace Project, the 92nd Street Y New Works in Dance Fund, and Dance New Amsterdam. Photo Credit: Paul B. Goode
Location
State Beach Pedestrian walk way266 Edgartown Oak Bluffs Rd, Vineyard Haven, MA 02568, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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Dance FloorSculpture by Simon Hook

In the silence of this film I imagined I could hear the crunch of snow underfoot. To me the film was about random acts we have no control over but that have a profound impact on our lives. The film made me reflect on choices and their consequences, on others, and us as we walk through life. I felt hope and acceptance around those consequences. I titled my sculpture “Dancefloor” which was inspired somewhat by the Australian Aboriginal tribes (like the Pintobe and the Walperry) who make three dimensional dance floors on flattened earth, then place clay balls and shapes, colored with pigment, in a significant pattern to describe an event. Then before the sunset, they dance the shapes into oblivion.

Artist
Simon Hook Medium: Sculpture Elsewhere: http://simonhook.net simon@simonhook.net
Location
State Beach Pedestrian Walk Way234 Edgartown Oak Bluffs Rd, Vineyard Haven, MA, USA Open in Google Maps › Open in Apple Maps ›
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